Pragmatic History of Economic Thought: Explaining Trade Practices and Policies in Kenya

Authors

  • Majune Kraido Socrates University of Nairobi
  • Mwania Davis Kimuli

Keywords:

history of economic thought, trade reforms, Kenya

Abstract

This study explains trade regimes and practices in Kenya from a history of economic thought (HET) perspective using secondary materials. We find that the trade landscape in Kenya is divided into three periods: pre-colonial (before 1895), colonial (1895-1962), and post-colonial (1963 to date). The first two eras did not have a clear trade policy. The pre-colonial era had a mixture of classical doctrines and mercantilism whereby long-distance and barter trade between communities were practiced. Nonetheless, certain communities restricted trade. Classical economic thought was practiced in the colonial period (1895-1962), whereby agricultural produce was exported and less expensive consumables were imported. The postcolonial period started with a mercantilism approach (import-substitution) but successive regimes have promoted classical doctrines of trade by reducing import and export barriers, and creating trade-promotion institutions. Trade in services, which is topical in international trade, has also been promoted in this regime. 

JEL Codes: B10, B17, B20, B27

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Author Biographies

Majune Kraido Socrates, University of Nairobi

School of Economics 

Mwania Davis Kimuli

School of Economics

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Published

2020-06-30

How to Cite

Kraido Socrates, M., & Davis Kimuli, M. (2020). Pragmatic History of Economic Thought: Explaining Trade Practices and Policies in Kenya. Tanzanian Economic Review, 10(1), 123-138. Retrieved from https://ter.udsm.ac.tz/index.php/ter/article/view/59